My New Favorite Podcast

I am unfortunately in that group of souls that have a long commute. I can't control where my great job is, but that doesn't mean I like spending so much time in the car. To pass the time, I look for interesting podcasts, and I've stumbled on one that has me fascinated. Dan Carlin's Hardcore History is pretty amazing.

Unlike most podcasts, HH is incredibly detailed. The latest, Blueprint for Armageddon I, is over three hours on the events leading up to WWI. I've spent some time reading about WWI, but I learned a ton of new information from this podcast.

I'm now getting through "Death Throes of the Republic, Parts I-VI". I've only made it through part I so far, but it's fascinating listening to all the details that lead to the fall of the Roman Empire.

So, if you're into history, and you have some time on your hands, I recommend checking out Hardcore History.

Source: http://www.dancarlin.com/disp.php/hharchiv...

Bletchley Park Snubbed by British Government

UK Snubs Support for Home of WWII Enigma

Here we go again. Bletchley Park continues to get little love. Here we have what is basically one on of the birthplaces of modern computing. On top of that, the group of people that worked here, along with their US partners in Building 26, did more to shorten WWII and save countless lives than just about any other group. Makes your life as a military leader a whole lot easier when you know what your counterpart is up to.

It seems now that the UK will not give Bletchley Park the same status as Imperial War Museum.

"We have no plans at present to associate it with the Imperial War Museum," Lord Davies said. "The House is all too well aware of the significance of designating any area in association with a museum of that rank, but I want to give an assurance that Bletchley Park will continue to develop under the resources made available to it."

OK, I know I'm a little biased because I'm a history buff, but I'm also aware of the history of my profession. Without these two groups of scientists, we might not have the same level of computing we have today. This is where Alan Turing (of Turing Machine fame) cut his chops.

Let's not forget about these people and what they did. I know it was super-secret, but it was almost 70 years ago now.